Tag Archives: soy sauce

Tuna Salad w/ Wasabi Vinaigrette

My sister died unexpectedly seven weeks ago. It was a tragic accident that I never thought would happen to anyone in my family. It’s strange how time slows down after experiencing the loss of someone close to you. I find myself pondering lots of existential questions and trying to make sense of everything. It’s so easy to just give in to the darkness and say, “fuck it” to the world. I did that for the first several weeks. I needed to cry and wail and feel the anger, sadness, and regret. It made me feel better temporarily. I still walk around feeling empty and very alone much of the time. I know these feelings will pass, and life will become bearable again, eventually.

Mr. K and I took a spontaneous trip to Connecticut over the weekend. We needed to get away and take time for ourselves. It felt restorative to walk along the water, breathe in the fresh air, and just observe people living their lives. I want to savor the sweet moments that I have with my loved ones. I keep wondering how much time is left for people that I love. It’s just where my brain often goes these days. I recently re-watched the finale of Six Feet Under, one of my favorite dramas. I had forgotten that Nate dies shortly before the show ends. The show does a beautiful job of portraying all of the messy and complicated feelings that people experience when they are grieving. When you lose a family member, you have your own grief to contend with, but you also want to be there for the remaining family members who are also grieving. Some days, it can be tricky to do both. At the very end of Six Feet Under, Claire is driving off to NYC to start a new chapter of her life, and while she is driving, we flash forward and see how and when each main character will die. Before Claire leaves, she tells her mom she doesn’t want to go to New York, but instead wants to stay there with her family. The response of Claire’s mom is extremely beautiful and gut-wrenching. She essentially tells her, “No, you are not allowed to stay here. Go and live your life.” That is the dilemma we face after a loved one dies. Part of us wants to die as well, but the best thing we can do to honor our loved ones who have died is to live a meaningful life. Most of us won’t ever know how much time we have left on earth, but we can be brave and live life with a curiosity, openness, and compassion that would make our loved ones proud.

I have only prepared a fresh tuna dish once or twice in my life. I need to do it more often, because it’s delicious as well as healthy. And so much better than the canned version. This salad is perfect for hot summer weather, as it only takes a few minutes to sear the tuna. Enjoy, and have a great week!

Tuna Salad w/ Wasabi Vinaigrette
Adapted from Rachael Ray

Yield: 1 serving

  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 ripe avocado, sliced
  • 6-8 cherry tomatoes
  1. Coat your steak with a combination of five-spice powder, salt, and pepper. Place 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a saute pan, and heat pan over high heat. Add tuna steak to the hot cooking surface and sear tuna 2 minutes on each side. Remove tuna from heat.
  2. Combine greens, scallions, cucumber, avocado, and tomatoes in a bowl. In a smaller bowl, whisk wasabi, vinegar and soy sauce. Whisk in remaining 2 Tbsp. oil to combine dressing. Drizzle dressing over your salad and toss to coat evenly. Slice tuna on an angle and arrange on the salad.

Healthy Pad Thai

L1030054I am not a fan of making New Year’s resolutions.  Rather, I prefer reflecting on the past year–my accomplishments and what I am grateful for.  It helps me to take stock of where I am in life and how I want to move forward in the coming year.   2015 was a very good year:  I was promoted to General Manager of the bakery I work at, I concluded therapy after 4 years with an incredible therapist, and I traveled to Norway, Sweden, France and Switzerland with my husband.
L1030053Seeing as that I’m turning 40 this year, I feel the need to try some new things and push myself out of my comfort zone.  I signed up for a Half-Marathon in April, and Mr. K and I plan on taking a trip to China this summer.  I also want to learn Spanish, once-and-for-all!  Of course, always on my list is trying out new recipes, and this past week it was Pad Thai.  I, like most people, love Pad Thai, but I rarely order it when I eat out, as it’s usually a really heavy dish, and loaded with calories.  I found this Mark Bittman recipe and decided to tweak it a bit to make it lighter and healthier.  Enjoy!
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Healthy Pad Thai
Adapted from Mark Bittman via The New York Times

4 ounces fettuccine-width rice noodles
1/8 cup peanut oil
1 teaspoon tamarind paste
1/2 teaspoon fish sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
1/2 teaspoon sesame oil
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon honey
1 teaspoon rice vinegar
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes, or to taste
2 cups shredded cabbage
1 cup red cabbage
1 garlic clove, minced
2 eggs
1/2 cup roasted peanuts, chopped
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

  1. Put noodles in a large bowl and add boiling water to cover. Let sit until noodles are just tender; check every 5 minutes or so to make sure they do not get too soft. Drain, drizzle with one tablespoon peanut oil to keep from sticking and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, put tamarind paste, fish sauce, soy sauce, ginger, lime juice, sesame oil, oyster sauce, salt, pepper, honey and vinegar in a small saucepan over medium-low heat and bring just to a simmer. Stir in red pepper flakes and set aside.
  3. Put remaining 3 tablespoons oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat; when oil shimmers, add garlic and cook for about a minute. Add eggs to pan; once they begin to set, scramble them until just done. Add cabbage and continue to cook until cabbage begins to wilt.
  4. Add drained noodles to pan along with sauce. Toss everything together to coat with tamarind sauce and combine well. When noodles are warmed through, serve, sprinkling each dish with peanuts and garnishing with cilantro.

Kung Pao Brussels Sprouts

DSC_5826I’m pretty sure I’ve mentioned before how I used to despise brussels sprouts when I was a kid.  My mom would simply boil them and serve them to us, as though they were supposed to be edible.  Since then, I have come to love brussels sprouts.  In fact, they are one of my top 5 favorite veggies of all time.   I love their bitter earthiness, and they are so versatile – you can pair them with sweet, sour, spicy, umami, whichever flavor profile you want!  They won’t let you down.  One of my 2015 goals was to make more Asian dishes, because, well, why not, really.  I came across this recipe in a recent Bon Appétit issue, and ripped it out immediately to add to my recipe folder.   Taking a look at my folder reminded me that I need to post on this blog more frequently, lest I want to end up being a recipe hoarder and die by having a box of recipes fall on my head.

This recipe is for all of the brussels sprouts lovers out there, as well as the Asian food lovers.  Enjoy!

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Kung Pao Brussels Sprouts
Adapted from Bon Appétit

2 lb. brussels sprouts, halved
5 Tbsp. vegetable oil, divided
Sea salt, freshly ground pepper
1 Tbsp. cornstarch
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 Tbsp. finely chopped, peeled ginger
2 Tbsp. hot chili paste
6 dried chiles de árbol, lightly crushed
1/2 cup soy sauce
3 Tbsp. sugar
2 tsp. unseasoned rice vinegar
1/3 cup unsalted, roasted peanuts

1.  Preheat oven to 425 F degrees.  Toss brussels sprouts and 4 Tbsp. oil on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper.
2.  Roast, tossing once, until softened (but not soft) and browned, 20-25 minutes.  Set aside.
3.  Meanwhile, mix cornstarch and 1 Tbsp. water in a small bowl until smooth.
4.  Heat remaining 1 Tbsp. oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high.  Add garlic and ginger and cook, stirring often, until garlic is golden brown, about 2 minutes.
5.  Add chili paste and cook, stirring, until darkened, about 2 minutes.  Add chiles, soy sauce, sugar, vinegar, and 1/2 cup water and bring to a boil; stir in cornstarch slurry.
6.  Simmer, stirring, until sauce coats spoon, about 2 minutes.  Let cool slightly.  Toss brussels sprouts with sauce and serve topped with peanuts.

Pan-Seared Tuna Steaks with Ginger Vinaigrette

DSC_5873My relationship with my dad has come a long way.  I feel like he respects who I am, and how I live my life, even if he doesn’t always agree with my decisions.  We don’t talk on the phone that often, but when we do, we make sure to always say, “I love you” before hanging up.  However, as a kid, you could not have convinced me that I would one day have a loving relationship with my dad.  Back then, he was a very different person.  I just don’t think he wanted to be married, and he most definitely did not want to be strapped with two children in his mid-twenties, let alone with two girls.    He was pretty mean and angry, and I was basically scared of him a lot of the time.  Looking back now as an adult, I have empathy for him as a young parent who didn’t have the tools to be a good father.

Things started to slowly shift when I was in my teens.  I’m not sure what changed for him, but I could tell he was working on becoming a better man, and parent.  I remember him blowing up at me for something I did, and then later coming upstairs to my room and apologizing.  There was so much sadness in his eyes.  He looked at me and said something along the lines of how he had reacted was the complete opposite of how he should have reacted, and that he would try to do better next time.  Hearing my dad say that shifted something in the universe for me that day.  It was one of the first times I comprehended that adults, people, could change, and for the better.   We aren’t born a certain way, predestined for a specific path.  Rather, we decide who we want to be.

I’ve often wondered if my dad carries around any guilt or shame about the kind of dad he was to my sister and I growing up.  A few summers ago I went home for a visit.  My dad and I went out for an early morning walk, and we started talking about how things were when I was a kid.  I told him that the only way for my brain to reconcile the man he was back then with the man he is today is to think of them as two completely different people.  It’s like at some point, he shed the skin of my younger dad, and morphed into my older dad–one who is patient, kind, affectionate, and considerate.   I have so much love for my dad.  And although we are a lot alike in many ways, we see the world differently.  After all that we have been through, it feels so good to think of my dad, and smile.

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I’m pretty sure this was the first time I’ve ever made a dish using fresh tuna.  I was shocked at how easy it was.  I mean, it should be easy, because it’s fish, but making a tuna dish always seemed so intimidating to me.  If you enjoy fresh tuna and have never attempted a dish in your own kitchen, start with this one.  It’s super simple and very tasty.

Pan-Seared Tuna Steaks with Ginger Vinaigrette
Adapted from Food and Wine

5 Tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce
5 Tbsp. sake
2-1/2 Tbsp. mirin
3 Tbsp. minced shallot
1/2 Tbsp. finely grated, peeled fresh ginger
1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper
1 bunch of Broccolini, trimmed
Two 1-inch-thick yellowfin tuna steaks
2 tsp. toasted white sesame seeds

1.  In a small saucepan, simmer the soy sauce, sake, mirin and shallot until the liquid is slightly reduced, 3 minutes.  Remove from the heat: stir in the ginger.  Slowly whisk in 1/4 cup of the oil.  Season with salt and pepper.
2.  In a steamer basket set in a large saucepan of simmering water, steam the Broccolini until tender, about 6 minutes.  Transfer to plates.
3.  Meanwhile, in a large non-stick skillet, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil.  Season the tuna with salt and pepper.  Sear over high heat until golden brown but still rare within, about 30 seconds per side.
4.  Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to drain.  Slice against the grain and transfer to the plates.  Drizzle with some of the vinaigrette and sprinkle with the sesame seeds.
5.  Serve with the remaining vinaigrette.