Tag Archives: eggs

Almond Butter and Apricot Bars

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I got a call from my dad last Tuesday saying my grandma had become unresponsive. The nurse told my dad and his siblings that she would most likely pass in the coming days.  I asked my dad to call me as soon as she passed away. I waited for the call. It was excruciating. By the end of the day Thursday there was still no change. By then, I had become extremely anxious and wasn’t sleeping well. I needed to numb the pain and not deal with my feelings. I didn’t know what else to do with myself, so I started to eat and didn’t stop until Saturday night.  I ate potato chips, ice cream, pizza, chocolate and cookies. I couldn’t shove the food in fast enough to fill the hole.  I hadn’t eaten like that in years. I actually went to bed Saturday night feeling sick. My dad called Sunday morning to tell me that my grandma passed away Saturday night with several of her kids by her bedside. And just like that, the bingeing was over. Now that my grandma was gone, I could let myself feel the pain of losing her. I wanted to go for a run and process my grief while listening to music. It was the most nurturing thing I could think of to do for myself. I blared Beyonce in my earbuds and started to run, all the while thinking about my grandma’s life. It wasn’t an easy one, but I hope that she had true moments of joy and contentment.
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This recipe is an Ina Garten one that I tweaked simply because I had apricot jam in my refrigerator that I wanted to use. I love the combination of almond and apricot, especially when almond extract is involved. Of course, you can easily swap out the almond butter for peanut butter and use strawberry jam in lieu of the apricot jam if you want a straight-up classic combination. But it’s fun to try new flavors, and if you haven’t experienced the almond/apricot pairing, I encourage you to try this. Even if you’re not a seasoned baker, it’s a very approachable recipe.  It also feels a bit autumnal, which is absolutely perfect for this week.

Almond Butter and Apricot Bars
Adapted from Ina Garten

Yield:  24 bars

1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter, at room temperature
3/4 cups sugar
3/4 cups brown sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 teaspoon almond extract
2 large eggs, at room temperature
2 cups creamy almond butter
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 1/2 cups apricot jam
2/3 cups almond slivers

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a 9 x13x2-inch cake pan. Line it with parchment paper, then grease and flour the pan.
2. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and sugars on medium speed until light yellow, about 2 minutes.
3. With the mixer on low speed, add the vanilla and almond extract, eggs, and almond butter and mix until all ingredients are combined.
4. In a small bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt. With the mixer on low speed, slowly add the flour mixture to the almond butter mixture. Mix just until combined.
5. Spread 2/3 of the dough into the prepared cake pan and spread over the bottom with a knife or offset spatula. Spread the jam evenly over the dough. Drop small globs of the remaining dough evenly over the jam. Don’t worry if all the jam isn’t covered; it will spread in the oven.
6. Sprinkle with almond slivers and bake for 45 minutes, until golden brown. Cool completely, and cut into squares.

 

Bacon, Kale & Tomato Frittatas

L1050516A dear old friend visited last week. We had not seen each other in over 15 years.  15 years. It’s pretty astounding that we’ve kept in touch all these years, seeing as that we initially only spent a few months together back in 1997. I studied abroad in Lancaster, England the spring semester of my junior year. I had no idea what a pivotal experience that would turn out to be for me. College is usually a time of growth and self-exploration for a lot of people, but there is something more acute about living in a foreign country by yourself when you are 20 years old. It’s almost like starting all over again, like the first day of college, except you stand out so much more because you’re a “yankee” and you have to learn new words like “snog” and “bollocks”.

My time in England was where my inner-feminist blossomed, and I’m still not completely sure how or why. While there, I met several smart, interesting young women who would have probably defined themselves as feminists, but it wasn’t something that I remember us specifically talking about. Rather, it was in the subtle ways they lived their lives. They made certain assumptions about being a woman that I found very refreshing. Until then, I had always struggled with my female identity – what it meant to be a woman. I remember coming back home after six months and feeling transformed in so many ways.
L1050505Because it was such an intense inner-growth period for me, the friends that I made during that time are still very dear to me. Stephanie is one of those friends. She now lives in Australia and has a beautiful family. They all came to NYC last week for a visit. I was super excited to see my friend after such a long time, but I surprised myself by getting choked up when we hugged. It was like no time had passed at all, and we picked up where we left off all those years ago.

In my never-ending quest to make healthy recipes (I promise there will be gluttonous recipes to come) I found this one recently and thought it sounded both easy and delicious. Weekday breakfasts can get a bit boring; I’ve been trying to eat more eggs for breakfast during the week, but I was getting tired of scrambled eggs every day. Frittatas are a nice way to change it up. You can essentially add anything you want to them. This recipe calls for bacon, but I substituted hot dogs since we had some in the refrigerator. The frittatas even make a quick and healthy lunch!
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Bacon, Kale & Tomato Frittatas
Adapted from Shape

Yield: 6 servings

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup chopped, stemmed kale
8 cherry tomatoes, halved
4 slices bacon, chopped
4 eggs
4 egg whites
1/2 cup Greek yogurt
Salt and pepper

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly spray a muffin tin with nonstick cooking spray.
2. Over medium heat, pour the olive oil into a medium-size pan. Add bacon and cook for 5 minutes, or until desired level of crispness.
3. Add kale and tomatoes and cook for an additional 3-5 minutes.
4. In a large bowl, beat together 4 eggs and 4 egg whites. Add Greek yogurt and mix until fluffy.
5. Add bacon, kale and tomatoes to egg mixture.
6. Season with salt and pepper and mix well.
7. Divide among 6 muffin cups. Bake for 20 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean.

Zucchini Bread Pancakes

DSC_6087I ran a 10K a few weekends ago.  It was the first one I’ve run in 2 1/2 years.  A friend of mine gave me her spot in the race, so I took it as an opportunity to try and push myself.  My workout routine became very slack over the summer months– that and perhaps too many sweets­­– which resulted in my pants being tighter than they should be.   So it felt good to have a goal to work towards.  I did a lot of running intervals on the treadmill at 6 a.m., and subsequently, remembered what it was like to feel euphoric after a good workout.   Things went along pretty smoothly over the course of my 4 weeks of training, even though I knew I might be pushing myself more, and faster, than I should be.   However, on my last long run before the race, I hit a wall.  I don’t know what happened, but I had to stop and walk several times.  My legs felt like lead.  It was a horrible run, and I felt really shitty about it.  In retrospect, I might have been focusing too much on my speed.  Afterword, I tried to reassure myself that a less-than-stellar run was o.k.  Despite my anxiety about the upcoming race, I told myself to focus on going slow and running the entire 10K, and not worry about my finishing time.
DSC_6078I woke up at 5:30 a.m. that Sunday morning and headed into Manhattan.  I tried to shake off any lingering doubts about my recent running performance.  I repeated a mantra:  Slow and steady; just finish.  It was a beautiful morning.  The sun was just coming up, and there was a cool breeze coming off the Hudson River.  I ran what I thought was a super-slow pace.  Many, many people passed me.   I just put my head down and kept running.   I felt really good for the entire race.  I figured if I had enough energy towards the end, I would pick up my pace a bit and try to finish strong.   Indeed, I did.  I ran an 11-minute mile, which is a personal best for me.   I was incredibly proud of myself, and my feeling of euphoria lasted the rest of the day.  I remember thinking that I wanted to hold on to this feeling for as long as possible.  If only we could retrieve feelings the way we can pull up a song to elicit a memory.  I hope to remember that feeling when I’m having a crummy day.  As a reward for the 10K, I treated myself to my favorite pancakes in the city at Johnny’s Luncheonette.
DSC_6081Speaking of pancakes (I didn’t even plan that transition!), these zucchini bread pancakes need to go on your Make Immediately recipe list.  Light and healthy, they also scream, “Fall is finally here!”  And the maple yogurt is the perfect topping on these, as straight up maple syrup would be too sweet for these beauties, in my opinion.  Instead, the tang of the yogurt provides a nice complement to the sweet spices.
DSC_6089Zucchini Bread Pancakes
Adapted from Smitten Kitchen

Yield:  10 to 12 pancakes

2 large eggs
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons light brown or dark brown sugar
1/4 cup buttermilk or 2 tablespoons each of milk and plain yogurt, whisked until smooth
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups shredded zucchini (about 1 1/2 medium zucchini)
1 cup all-purpose flour (half can seamlessly be swapped with a whole wheat flour)
1/4 teaspoon table salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground or freshly grated nutmeg
Butter or oil, for coating skillet

1. In a large bowl, combine eggs, olive oil, sugar, buttermilk and vanilla until smooth. Stir in zucchini shreds.
2. In a smaller bowl, whisk together flour, salt, baking soda, cinnamon and nutmeg. Stir dry ingredients into zucchini batter, mixing until just combined.
3. Preheat oven to 200°F and place a baking sheet on a middle rack.
4. Heat a large, heavy skillet over medium heat. Once hot, melt a pat of butter in pan and swirl it around until it sizzles.
5. Scoop scant 1/4-cup dollops of batter in pan so the puddles do not touch. Cook until bubbles appear on the surface, about 2 to 3 minutes. Flip pancakes and cook another minute or two, until golden underneath.
6. Transfer pancakes to prepared pan to keep warm as well as ensure that they’re all cooked through when they’re served. Repeat with remaining batter. Serve warm.

Coconut-Buttermilk Pie with Blackberry Caramel

DSC_5113Like most people this week, I was shocked and saddened to hear about the suicide of Robin Williams.  As horrible as it feels to lose such a creative genius, I do hope that it creates greater awareness about the dark hole of depression.  It affects so many people and yet there is still a huge lack of understanding about this disease.  I recently heard someone say, “The next time someone tells you to shake off your depression by going outside and getting some fresh air, you should respond by saying, ‘Oh right, like how cancer patients can shake off their cancer.”  I think depression (and addiction) is hard for many Americans to accept as a disease.  It flies in the face of our cultural norms.  We are supposed to be a self-sufficient group, able to overcome anything.  But severe depression can level you.  And no one is exempt from developing depression at some point in his or her life.  Others will battle it their entire lives.   So let’s talk about it.  Let’s not pretend that it doesn’t exist or that it’s not that big of a deal.  It matters.
DSC_5068DSC_5079It feels like there has been an onslaught of bad news this summer.  I’m not sure if media companies are just becoming more and more desperate to report anything that will get us to click on their story links, or if the world really is becoming a horrific place.  I used to think that it was my responsibility to read/listen to the news everyday so as to stay informed.  And I’m not too proud to admit that I think I became a bit righteous about it.  I would judge other people who weren’t as informed as myself.  But I’ve since come to realize that it bears no fruit if I’m not trying to create a change in the world with the information that I consume.  All it really does is depress the hell out of me.  I’m starting to scale back on my news consumption.  I think it has helped my outlook.  Instead, I’m spending more time learning about things I’m curious about.  I read my first Paul Theroux book, I listened to a podcast about the Space Race, and I watched a YouTube video on how to freehand embroider.
DSC_5083DSC_5093I love Bobby Flay’s recipes, even if they always involve 5 or 6 steps and require a decent amount of time.  I’ve heard he has a bit of a reputation of being an asshole, but that doesn’t stop me from continuing to make his recipes and buy his cookbooks.  When I had my chocolate company, he actually purchased several gift boxes from me one holiday season to give to business associates.  I was over the moon.  Like his other recipes, this one does not disappoint, but it does involve several steps.  I have been eating blackberries like water this summer, so this was a fun way to do something different with them other than to eat them with a dollop of fresh whipped cream.
DSC_5109Coconut-Buttermilk Pie with Blackberry Caramel
Adapted from Food & Wine

Serves: 8

Crust
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp. sugar
3/4 tsp. sea salt
1 stick cold unsalted butter, cubed
1/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. buttermilk

Filling
3 large eggs
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup buttermilk
4 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted and cooled slightly
1/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk
2 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
1 vanilla bean, split, seeds scraped
1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
1 tsp. pure coconut extract
1/3 cup sweetened shredded coconut
Pinch of salt

Blackberry Caramel
2 cups blackberries (8 oz.), halved
3/4 cup plus 2 Tbsp. sugar
1/2 cup heavy cream, warmed
2 tsp. blackberry liqueur
1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
Pinch of salt
Toasted sweetened shredded coconut, for garnish

1.  In a food processor, pulse the flour with the sugar and salt,  Add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal with some pea-size pieces remaining.  Drizzle the buttermilk on top and pulse until the dough just comes together.  Turn the dough out onto a work surface, gather up any crumbs and pat the dough into a disk.  Wrap in plastic and refrigerate until well chilled, about 1 hour.
2.  On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough to a 12-inch round, a scant 1/4 inch thick.  Ease the dough into a 9-inch glass pie plate.  Trim the overhanging dough to 1 inch, fold it under itself and crimp the dough decoratively.  Refrigerate the crust until firm, about 30 minutes.
3.  Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.  Line the crust with parchment paper and fill with pie weights or dried beans.  Bake the crust in the lower third of the oven for about 20 minutes, until barely set.  Remove the parchment paper and pie weights.  Cover the edge of the crust with strips of foil and bake for 15 to 20 minutes longer, until the crust is lightly browned.  Let cool on a rack.  Leave the foil strips on the crust rim.  Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees F.
4.  In a large bowl, whisk the eggs with the sugar until pale.  Add the buttermilk, butter, coconut milk, flour, vanilla seeds and both extracts and whisk until smooth, then stir in the shredded coconut.
5.  Set the pie plate on a baking sheet.  Pour in the custard and bake for 40 to 45 minutes, until set around the edge but slightly jiggly in the center.  Transfer to a rack and let the pie cool completely.
6.  In a small saucepan, combine 1 cup of blackberries with 2 tablespoons of sugar and 1 tablespoon of water.  Cook over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, until the berries start to burst.  Transfer the berries and any juices to a blender and puree until nearly smooth.  Transfer the puree to the saucepan and let cool slightly, then whisk in the cream, blackberry liqueur, vanilla and salt.
7.  In a medium saucepan, combine the remaining 3/4 cup of sugar with 1/4 cup of water.  Cook over moderate heat, swirling the pan and brushing down the side with a wet pastry brush, until the sugar dissolves.  Cook undisturbed until an amber caramel forms, about 7 minutes.  Add the blackberry cream and simmer, whisking, until the caramel is smooth, 1 to 2 minutes.  Let cool slightly, then stir in the remaining 1 cup of blackberries; let cool to room temperature.  Garnish the pie with toasted coconut, cut into wedges and serve with the blackberry caramel.

Dutch Baby Pancake

DSC_4022I am a complete pancake snob and it’s all my grandma’s fault.  She owned a café when I was growing up, and she made the best buttermilk pancakes in all the land.  If cooking/travel shows had existed back then, I am positive they would have declared her pancakes to be the best.  She would have made Bobby Flay weep in a pancake “throwdown”.  My grandma essentially ruined pancakes for me for the rest of my life. *sigh*  Her pancakes were like a beautiful stack of clouds with crispy, golden brown edges smothered in fresh butter.  My parents would drop off my sister and I at the café almost every morning throughout my first year of school.  It was my grandma’s responsibility to feed us before we walked to school.  I don’t remember eating anything other than those pancakes.  Every.  Single.  Morning.  Looking back, I wonder if she ever became concerned that I was carbo-loading before school every day.  I was already a slightly chubby kid, and the pancakes ensured that I grew out of my pants very quickly. DSC_4014Now, I’ve tried hundreds of pancakes throughout my 37 years.  For many years, it was my go-to brunch choice.  I thought if I just ordered pancakes at enough restaurants, eventually I would strike gold.  They can’t ALL taste like cardboard, can they??  Oh yes, yes they can.  Since then, I have only found one other restaurant (ONE!) that makes pancakes as good as my grandma’s.  It happens to be a greasy spoon diner in Manhattan called Johny’s Luncheonette.  They are moist and tangy from the buttermilk and yet nice and crispy around the edges.  This place is actually one block away from my husband and I’s old apartment in Chelsea.  We lived together in that apartment for three years but we didn’t discover Johny’s until the last six months we were there.  I was both elated to find it and yet saddened that it had been there all along without my knowledge.  I am serious about my pancakes.  DSC_4017I wish I had known about Dutch baby pancakes much earlier.  I guess I did, technically speaking.  There is a restaurant in Rochester, MN called Pannekoeken that makes pancakes in the style that originates from The Netherlands/Belgium- essentially Dutch baby pancakes.  They are much wider and thinner than American pancakes, and are typically baked in a skillet.  I know I had them occasionally at Pannekoeken growing up but they were never all that memorable.   Again, thanks Grandma.  A friend alerted me to this recipe a couple of years ago and said I had to try it.  She was sure it would make the cut.  She was right.  I think I ate half the pan that morning in-between raving about it to my husband.  The recipe comes from Melissa Clark’s cookbook, In the Kitchen with A Good Appetite.  It’s a great investment if you are looking for a worthwhile cookbook to add to your collection.

Dutch baby pancakes are eggier and sweeter than American pancakes.  There is also plenty of butter in the pancakes themselves so no need to add any on top.  After they have finished baking, all you have to do is sprinkle confectioner’s sugar and lemon juice on top and voilá, breakfast is served.  The best part is that you don’t have to stand over the stove and make an infinite number of pancakes, which can be time consuming.  Dutch babies are baked in the oven and take all of 15 minutes.  I added a dollop of elderberry jam to mine, just because.

DSC_4027Dutch Baby Pancake
Adapted from In the Kitchen with A Good Appetite

Yield:  1 pancake

3 large eggs, lightly beaten
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Pinch of salt
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (about 1/2 lemon)

1.  Preheat the oven to 425°F.  In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, milk, flour, cinnamon, and salt until combined.  The mixture will be lumpy.
2.  In a 10-inch ovenproof skillet over medium heat, melt the butter.  When the butter has melted, carefully pour in the pancake batter and transfer the skillet to the oven.  Bake until the pancake is puffy and golden brown around the edges, about 15-20 minutes.
3.  Working quickly, take the skillet out of the oven and, using a fine-mesh sieve, shake the confectioner’s sugar over the pancake.  Return the skillet to the oven until the butter has been absorbed into the pancake and the sugar is lightly caramelized, an additional 3 minutes.
4.  Splash the lemon juice over the pancake, cut into wedges, and serve immediately.